Jump to content
Hash, Inc. Forums
Sign in to follow this  
Raf Anzovin

Duel poster

Recommended Posts

Man, you guys suck! Suck so HARD!!! ... Ok, now that my jealousy is out of the way. Awesome. I can't wait to see this ani :).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
How do you guys arrange projects like this in A:M ? Do you have multiple projects, or just 1 big one? Do you have a lot of action's or do most of the animating in the chor? Do you have many chor's? Or will all these questions be answered in your "how to make a short" video?

Well, many of them probably will be answered in the CD (or, possibly, book). But there's no harm in answering them breifly here. We break the movie up into shot groups--each shot group will have anywhere from three to ten shots in one choreography (the camera jumps around between positions for cuts). Each shot group has it's own project file, but all the models are referenced. Although we do sometimes make use of actions, it's much more common for us to animate everything in the chor--the kind of animation we're doing here just doesn't lend itself to reusable actions much (although we do often make use of multiple chor actions on a single character).

 

--Raf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

impressive, goodlooking and original! that just about covers it. Really looking forward to seeing more of this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's really good! I'm really liking the way this is turning out. Great work!

 

-Robert

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I must say Im very impressed! The animations are splendid! If there ever was any critique to be found, I sure as heck can't find it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Love the style and music.

Before I started my Briar project, I toyed with the idea of doing it as a cross between 2D/3D. The speed advantages are obvious and like you've already pointed out, you can concentrate on the animation more and not get bogged down in textures and lighting.

I've never really liked the 3D toon look, it always looks too mathematical, but you've hit upon the best option. The squash and stretch has stopped the volumes from being too perfect and there is no cruddy toon line to mess things up.

 

Looking forward to seeing more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the way that the red guy's (gil grissam to me XP) coat moves when he jumps and lands. Very nice!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
And here's another near-complete shot. Like the other, it's a work in progress: still a few pass-throughs, temp background, and incomplete facial animation. But lots of swordplay.

 

http://www.anzovin.com/duelfighting.mov

Hey Raf,

 

Looks great except for Reds last swish with the swords (the ones aimed at blacks feet) 2 things bother me:

 

1. There was so much happening so fast it didn't register the first time I viewed it.

2. Black jumped to avoid them (the swords) but was facing the wrong way for the second swish to be able to see it comming!

 

BS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He obviously used the force! Duh!

 

:lol:

 

Actually, his head was turned and saw that he was going for the legs. Swordfighters usually have common moves with others, so for the second swish, he knew that the red guy would use his forward power to throw another swing, therefore he did that second hop. Hope that makes sense! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

WOW! I just caught up in this thread and I must say I am impressed. I love the traditional approach in style. Very inspiring. Most of the animation is spot on and very well executed. The backgrounds and sets are very graphic in nature and I love it. Can we see a final still render of a shot or two? Maybe one that shows off the sets and the lighting you intend to use? You guys (the Anzovinites) are making a fan out of me.

 

Dimos

 

P.S. To the folks that liked "The Road to El Dorado".....Thanks! I had a small role in that and I am pleased to see it is still enjoyed. Makes up for the hard work and time we had putting the film together. Much appreciated. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Can we see a final still render of a shot or two?

 

Pretty soon.....we're close to having some shots completely done.

 

1. There was so much happening so fast it didn't register the first time I viewed it.

 

True.....but I'm going for that frenetic fighting look. Similarly, you can't always pick out every move in a Jackie Chan or Jet Li movie. I don't really expect everyone to be able to register every move the first time they watch it--it should still be able to put over an overall sense of the kineticism of the fight.

 

Also, a full soundtrack helps a lot.

 

2. Black jumped to avoid them (the swords) but was facing the wrong way for the second swish to be able to see it comming!

 

Yes, well, Black has two secrets. One is that he's not really right-handed. The other is how he does that. Men have died trying to find out..... ;)

 

I still don't get how you got that look. It's looks like 100% ambience with shadows. 

 

It's all toon rendering without lines, and with different shading gradients. There actually aren't any shadows.

 

P.S. To the folks that liked "The Road to El Dorado".....Thanks! I had a small role in that and I am pleased to see it is still enjoyed. Makes up for the hard work and time we had putting the film together. Much appreciated. 

 

Cool. Although I was never a big fan of their storytelling, I thought Dreamworks Animation had a very interesting style going there for a while before they switched to all-CG. What did you do on Road to El Dorado?

 

I like the way that the red guy's (gil grissam to me XP) coat moves when he jumps and lands. Very nice!

 

Thanks! If this project was bigger, we'd probably do some kind fo simulation for that, but at this size it works to just do it by hand. Sometimes, animating little secondary things like that is a lot of fun.

 

--Raf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
P.S. To the folks that liked "The Road to El Dorado".....Thanks! I had a small role in that and I am pleased to see it is still enjoyed. Makes up for the hard work and time we had putting the film together. Much appreciated. 

 

Cool. Although I was never a big fan of their storytelling, I thought Dreamworks Animation had a very interesting style going there for a while before they switched to all-CG. What did you do on Road to El Dorado?

 

Yeah,

 

It's pretty sad that storytelling in the late 90's and early century from all the majors didn't seem as important as the big effects and wow imagery (except Pixar).

 

Anyhow I still had a great time working there and I met and worked along with some of the best animators bar none (my honest opinion of course). On "The Road To El Dorado" I animated on the character team of Miguel, the long blond hair guy voiced by Kenneth Branaugh (sp*). In Traditional Animation, for those of you who are unaware, most times an animator usually animates one character. That way the character remains as consistent as possible throughout the flick. Miguel's team I believe had about 20-30 (if not more) animators working on him, not including Cleanup Artist (or Final Line Artist as they were pegged at Dreamworks).

 

Thank God for Pixar's storytelling because it forced the rest of the folk in animation to catch up in that department. As far as artistry I believe that all studios that have put out a animated feature have something special about there work. I don't believe that one studio out ranks the others in design, animation or imagery, because all of them have developed their own intriguing looks. And that's what it's all about, diversity!

 

Just my own thoughts.

 

Dimos

:D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In Traditional Animation, for those of you who are unaware, most times an animator usually animates one character. That way the character remains as consistent as possible throughout the flick. Miguel's team I believe had about 20-30 (if not more) animators working on him, not including Cleanup Artist (or Final Line Artist as they were pegged at Dreamworks).

 

I've always wondered about applying this idea to CG. It seems like it would add another layer to the acting to have each animator focus exclusively on one character throughout the film. Unfortunately, it's not cost effective. By contrast, the entire animation team on Robots was just a little over 30 people.

 

Thank God for Pixar's storytelling because it forced the rest of the folk in animation to catch up in that department. As far as artistry I believe that all studios that have put out a animated feature have something special about there work. I don't believe that one studio out ranks the others in design, animation or imagery, because all of them have developed their own intriguing looks. And that's what it's all about, diversity!

 

Yeah....I'm continually frustrated by all the cool things that could be done with animation and just aren't. Pixar is great--but they're just one studio. They have a certain style, and they won't depart from it to try something drastically different. And they seem to be the only people with a real grasp on story.

 

In the animation industry, we constantly hear the mantra "story, story, story." Only, it doesn't seem to make the stories any better. People agonize over them for months, and they're still weak.

 

I have this sneaking suspicion that the "animation process" everybody uses just plain doesn't work. That it hasn't really worked since the days of Walt, who could pull it together, probably, just from sheer force of personality. It's a relic from sixty years ago, and today what the feature animation industry needs is really simple. It needs to hire some really talented writers with individual voices. And then it needs to listen to them.

 

Hmmmm....that ended up being a bit more of a rant then I intended it to. Some day, I hope I'll be in a position where I can do something about this.

 

--Raf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have this sneaking suspicion that the "animation process" everybody uses just plain doesn't work. [...] It's a relic from sixty years ago, and today what the feature animation industry needs is really simple. It needs to hire some really talented writers with individual voices. And then it needs to listen to them.

No need to blame the animation process, it's just Hollywood. When there's that much money at stake, no one wants to take any risks. Hence the insane belief that 20 writers are better than 1. If no one sticks their neck out, no heads get chopped off.

 

Some day, I hope I'll be in a position where I can do something about this.

I don't want to sound confrontational, but that's BS. You're in as good a position as you'll ever be. You've got more connections and resources than most people, actually. You wanna do something about it, do something. Your responsibilities will always be there--you can't "out-wait" them.

 

Start writing a script. Start making phone calls. Today.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
No need to blame the animation process, it's just Hollywood. When there's that much money at stake, no one wants to take any risks. Hence the insane belief that 20 writers are better than 1. If no one sticks their neck out, no heads get chopped off.

 

You got it exactly right.

 

Unfortunately, that's largly what I meant by "animation process." To many, those practices have become inextricably linked with the making of animated films--and the ironic thing is that some of them, committee storytelling included, do have roots in the way the old Disney studio operated. So they can sometimes look like wisdom handed down from on high. I think it worked for Disney because he was both a guiding creative force, and he owned the whole thing, too. He could, personally, keep a handle on the madness.

 

I don't want to sound confrontational, but that's BS. You're in as good a position as you'll ever be. You've got more connections and resources than most people, actually. You wanna do something about it, do something. Your responsibilities will always be there--you can't "out-wait" them.

 

Don't worry, nothing confrontational about it. I do have more connections and resources than most do, it's true--but still nowhere near what would be necessary to get into features. Not yet.

 

Start writing a script.

 

Well that, I can do. Whenever feature animation does become feasible for us, I plan to be ready.

 

--Raf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have a spare moment, read this:

 

Never Wait

 

A friend sent it to me a few years ago, and it really helped focus my actions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you have a spare moment, read this:

 

Never Wait

 

Hmmmm....interesting. Just by complete coincidence, Terry Rossio happens to have been one of the co-writers on The Road to El Dorado--although what he and his writing partner came up with originally was apparently much better then what found its way to the screen.

 

In any case, I don't think I'm waiting in quite the way he means. He's not suggesting you should strive to do things when they are not yet possible, but that you should sieze the opportunity when it does arrive. A certain amount of pragmatism is neccessary if one is not to wear oneself out with quixotic quests. There's plenty to do in the meantime.

 

--Raf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I came back into this late once again.

 

Raf,

 

You can't blame the writers, you can't blame the artists and you can't blame the directors. Heck, most times you can't really blame the modern day producers because in reality mostly everybody on the production gets paid by the people with the money, the people who truly call the shots, and most of the decisions that are made are voted on by committees that then are second guessed over and over again and transform the products into a watered down bland version of it's origin idea. Their dime, their call. At the end of the day the product belongs to the people with the money. It is very sad but very true.

 

The producers and money folk of the eras gone by, as in the days of Tex, Chuck and Walt, had a lot more trust in their artists and studios. From what I remember learning and reading , their mentality (in a nutshell) was; "Here's the cash, now make us back some more". They generally stayed out of the creation process and it worked well for them. The problem with modern day animation is that the folks with the money are just to afraid to trust anyone with it and they begin to control every aspect of the creation process. Plain and simple.

 

In Traditional Animation, for those of you who are unaware, most times an animator usually animates one character. That way the character remains as consistent as possible throughout the flick. Miguel's team I believe had about 20-30 (if not more) animators working on him, not including Cleanup Artist (or Final Line Artist as they were pegged at Dreamworks). 

 

 

I've always wondered about applying this idea to CG. It seems like it would add another layer to the acting to have each animator focus exclusively on one character throughout the film. Unfortunately, it's not cost effective. By contrast, the entire animation team on Robots was just a little over 30 people.

 

 

It really would makes sense to do this because then the character acting would be very consistent throughout. One of the problems I have noticed in CG film in general is that character acting really differs from sequence to sequence. I remember that some of the artists on one the films I worked on tried to convince the CG production folks that this is a better way to keep things consistent but they wouldn't bite. In traditional animation when we had character teams, it wasn't only to keep drawings consistent, in actuality it was more so to keep acting consistent. Drawing were always re-drawn by the clean up department to keep the drawings as consistent as possible. I do not see why it can not be done in CG animation. There is a way. As far of size of teams that shouldn't matter too much. If there is any major interaction between multiple characters than the animator who's character takes precedence in the scene would animate the entire shot. That animator would have to then visit all the appropriate supervising character animators for feedback and the director would resolve any conflicts in the scene. It was done this way traditionally and worked out well (minus a couple of hurt egos from time to time).

 

Well that, I can do. Whenever feature animation does become feasible for us, I plan to be ready.

 

If you have a script an idea i suggest you start pitching it. If someone out there likes it (with the money and or resources), the money will come in for you to "prepare" yourselves. DON'T WAIT FOR IT TO COME TO YOU, GO OUT THERE AND FIND IT YOURSELVES.

 

Dimos

 

P.S. We seem to have similar ideals for animation. Now I am definitely a fan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dimos;

 

I think we're basically both saying the same thing, just from different angles.

 

It really would makes sense to do this because then the character acting would be very consistent throughout. One of the problems I have noticed in CG film in general is that character acting really differs from sequence to sequence. I remember that some of the artists on one the films I worked on tried to convince the CG production folks that this is a better way to keep things consistent but they wouldn't bite. In traditional animation when we had character teams, it wasn't only to keep drawings consistent, in actuality it was more so to keep acting consistent. Drawing were always re-drawn by the clean up department to keep the drawings as consistent as possible. I do not see why it can not be done in CG animation. There is a way. As far of size of teams that shouldn't matter too much. If there is any major interaction between multiple characters than the animator who's character takes precedence in the scene would animate the entire shot. That animator would have to then visit all the appropriate supervising character animators for feedback and the director would resolve any conflicts in the scene. It was done this way traditionally and worked out well (minus a couple of hurt egos from time to time).

 

You know, it really would. I think I'm going to try doing it this way the next time I do a short and see how it works.

 

I do see it slowing things down a bit--having to constantly pass shots back and forth between animators has got to make everything a little more time consuming. (After all, the animator has to polish one character in the shot till the director approves--then hand it off to another animator for the process to start all over again). But I imagine it would still be more then worth it for consistancy of acting on a feature. Also, I'm guessing that there are little spontanious acting bits that are likely to grow from this kind of colaberation by animators that never would if only one animator works on each shot.

 

If you have a script an idea i suggest you start pitching it. If someone out there likes it (with the money and or resources), the money will come in for you to "prepare" yourselves. DON'T WAIT FOR IT TO COME TO YOU, GO OUT THERE AND FIND IT YOURSELVES.

 

Ah, but doesn't that start the whole vicious cycle all over again? Money people like my ideas, money people give me money, money people own my soul? :)

 

Then they get to suck all the life out of my project like we were just talking about.

 

But.....there may be other ways......

 

And I DON'T feel like I have to go do it RIGHT NOW, or I'll somehow lose the chance. The next ten years are going to be a very exciting time for animation. Things are going to be possible that were never possible before.

 

I'm only 23. I'm at the begining of my career. Nobody ever did anything great by rushing into it at top speed.

 

I've seen some people get into features who--and this is just my opinion--kind of regret that they did. It took something they really enjoyed doing and turned it into a nightmare that they could barely control. To direct an animated feature--to direct a great animated feature--takes the kind of artistic control of a Brad Bird. It takes time to develop that control, that consistent vision.

 

P.S. We seem to have similar ideals for animation. Now I am definitely a fan.

 

Thanks! I have a whole lot of ideas about what could be done with animation, but I don't think this is really the right thread for it. Perhaps we should create a thread in the OT forum?

 

--Raf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a whole lot of ideas about what could be done with animation, but I don't think this is really the right thread for it. Perhaps we should create a thread in the OT forum?

 

--Raf

Thats sounds like a swell idea

 

BTW been following this thread. Great animation! and I am looking forward to the making a short DVD.

One question on the DVD. Do you have someone shooting video at your studio through out the production process? It would be interesting to see you guys hashing out productions ideas,problems, brainstorming and what not documentary style. To give an idea of what actually went into the production.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BTW been following this thread. Great animation! and I am looking forward to the making a short DVD.

One question on the DVD. Do you have someone shooting video at your studio through out the production process? It would be interesting to see you guys hashing out productions ideas,problems, brainstorming and what not documentary style. To give an idea of what actually went into the production.

 

Yup, we've been shooting a lot of our meetings and sweatbox sessions.

 

Right now it's looking like, rather then a DVD, this is going to be a book, which will come with a CD including the documentary we're making from the footage we're shooting.

 

--Raf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, it will probably still be a DVD or CD that we'll sell through the Anzovin store. The book would also come with, but we still haven't signed the book deal yet, so.....

 

Steve

Anzovin Studio

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think we're basically both saying the same thing, just from different angles.

 

I've noticed I tend to do that a lot in recent times! I mean say the same thing that the other people are saying but from an entirely different direction. I hate it because it seems like I'm arguing my point when there is no argument whatsoever. Ah well at least you know where I'm coming from.

 

You know, it really would. I think I'm going to try doing it this way the next time I do a short and see how it works.

 

I do see it slowing things down a bit--having to constantly pass shots back and forth between animators has got to make everything a little more time consuming. (After all, the animator has to polish one character in the shot till the director approves--then hand it off to another animator for the process to start all over again). But I imagine it would still be more then worth it for consistancy of acting on a feature. Also, I'm guessing that there are little spontanious acting bits that are likely to grow from this kind of colaberation by animators that never would if only one animator works on each shot.

 

Well sometimes you have to give up on something to gain something else. When a project concentrate more on time they get inconsistent work. When a project concentrates on consistency and quality it takes a little time. It's entirely up to the people in charge of the project on what they really want. I hope whatever method you use to best tell your story and create your film is one that you are truly happy about.

 

Ah, but doesn't that start the whole vicious cycle all over again? Money people like my ideas, money people give me money, money people own my soul? :)

 

Then they get to suck all the life out of my project like we were just talking about.

 

But.....there may be other ways......

 

And I DON'T feel like I have to go do it RIGHT NOW, or I'll somehow lose the chance. The next ten years are going to be a very exciting time for animation. Things are going to be possible that were never possible before.

 

You are so right, but even the greatest film makers settled for a little soul stealing at first. When they "proved" themselves in the eyes of the money folk after a project or two (or more), then their control comes back into play. Just a thought.

 

You don't have to do it right now because there is never a need to rush a good project. Indeed, take all the time to strengthen and improve on your ideas, it's always best to have the best possible package before pitching.

 

I'm only 23. I'm at the begining of my career. Nobody ever did anything great by rushing into it at top speed.

 

Ahhhhh! 23......I remember at is it was yesterday.....unfortunately for me it was 10 years ago. More power to you my friend and good luck in your future projects. Email me sometime and we can continue this discussion and more like it at other times. Thanks for the chat.

 

Dimos

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
...but even the greatest film makers settled for a little soul stealing at first. When they "proved" themselves in the eyes of the money folk after a project or two (or more), then their control comes back into play. Just a thought....

Good grief!

 

I just realized something... I think Steven Spielberg's movie directorial debut was a TV movie called...

 

Duel

 

I loved that movie...

 

This looks great Raf. I can't wait to find out why they are fighting... he cut him off in traffic... spilled his beer... or... tastes great... less filling... polygons vs. splines... so many options...

 

Vernon "Splines taste great!" Zehr

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Raf, have I mentioned lately how great your directing and animating skills are?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really love the style and the animation... very very nice...

 

*Fuchur*

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First let me get this out of the way so there is no misunderstanding here, I think that this is amazing!!!! Every aspect is just candy for the eyes.

BUt there is one little tiny section tht has been bothering me from the begining.

And it's a nit pick only cause I'm able to watch this over and over again.

The guy in the red does the jump spin move, while backing the man in black up against the left side ofthe screen. The man in black swings the sword at hip level and the man in red ducks the sword edge.

This part seem very very forced to me, like niether one of these guys would be able to do or would "reaction" wise choose to do during a fight.

Keep in mind this might just be the result of me watching this so many times!

 

If I made this would I fix it, NOPE. But I'm wondering Raf, if this is something that you thought about during the choreographing of the Sword fight.... difference between things being forced in or looking natural in motion?

edit..........................

I think what my question was, how do you flesh out the action? Is it all story boards, or are you actually doing the manuevers yourself or a combo?

Either way, very impressive!

 

Mike Fitz

www.3dartz.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow Raf!, That animation is amazing. I especially like how you give each character there own style of fighting. That makes the animation much more beleivable! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not to derail this thread but ...

I was really enjoying the discussion between Dimos and Raf. Are you guys gonna continue the conversation elsewhere?

 

Cya,

Doug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think what my question was, how do you flesh out the action? Is it all story boards, or are you actually doing the manuevers yourself or a combo?--Mike Fitz, www.3dartz.com

Raf's off at the "Robots" premiere today, but I can answer this to some degree (he may have more to say when he gets back).

 

The storyboard for Duel is very rough, and does not specify the exact choreography of each sequence.

 

Fight choreographer William Hobbs (The Three Musketeers, The Four Musketeers) was a strong influence. We are looking to reproduce much the same sword-brawling style; anyone out there who is a trained fencer or broadsworder will see right away that we aren't adhereing to any formal style. As you'll see in the final movie, there's also a fair amount of acrobatics, though nothing that's wire-fu.

 

Each character does indeed have his own fighting style, and these have evolved almost on their own as the short's progressed. The man in black is very catlike and acrobatic; he favors verticality. The man in red was originally conceived as more defensive and conservative, but now his moves are more open and powerful; he favors horizontalness in his attacks.

 

The music is the primary driver of motion detail; as we mentioned before, this is very much an action ballet. Even relatively small movements are coordinated with the score. It's actually quite a challenge to do this successfully, so that motion looks natural and not forced.

 

Raf develops the general fight chor in his head, based on his martial arts training and extensive study of swashbuckler movies, and explains/demonstrates it to each animator. But they have the freedom to reinterpret and improve the motion, especially if the improvements help drive the story, add interesting detail to the acting, or incorporate a good gag. People head into the main space or the back room to test out parries, thrusts, leaps, and twirls, or peer into their mirrors for facial expression feedback.

 

BTW, maybe I should list who else is working on Duel:

 

Dave Boutilier

Tim Dwyer

Cristin McKee

Morgan Robinson

Nat Stein

William Young

 

What we've shown so far is only a taste of the whole. Glad that people seem to like it.

 

--Steve

Anzovin Studio

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

awsome... just freakin awsome... there is nothing else to say.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry for taking so long to get back to you all about this stuff...I've been very busy lately, and I was in New York for the Robots premier recently. (I'll post my thoughts on that in a week or so when everyone else has had a chance to see it).

 

Raf, have I mentioned lately how great your directing and animating skills are?

 

Thanks, Martin!

 

BUt there is one little tiny section tht has been bothering me from the begining.

And it's a nit pick only cause I'm able to watch this over and over again.

The guy in the red does the jump spin move, while backing the man in black up against the left side ofthe screen. The man in black swings the sword at hip level and the man in red ducks the sword edge.

This part seem very very forced to me, like niether one of these guys would be able to do or would "reaction" wise choose to do during a fight.

Keep in mind this might just be the result of me watching this so many times!

 

If I made this would I fix it, NOPE. But I'm wondering Raf, if this is something that you thought about during the choreographing of the Sword fight.... difference between things being forced in or looking natural in motion?

 

That was something that was quite often on my mind, actually. I think in this case it just comes down to different eyes. To me, that move does look natural. Just a difference in opinion.

 

I think what my question was, how do you flesh out the action? Is it all story boards, or are you actually doing the manuevers yourself or a combo?

 

A remarkable amount of it is just made up on the spot. I didn't have a very good plan for this shot, only a general idea that they had to end by facing off with each other. The animation method I employed here is pretty similar to the technique that Shamus Culhane talks about in his book "Animation, Script to Screen." I started at the begining and I did what seemed natural. Then, of course, there's the whole process of refining what's been animated and getting comments from other animators, which is essential to giving it a polished feel. But the basic movement was done with a streight-ahead keyframe method, without reference to anything else.

 

Wow Raf!, That animation is amazing. I especially like how you give each character there own style of fighting. That makes the animation much more beleivable! 

 

Thanks! The styles also rely very much on what kind of weapons the character's use. Black is a rapier fighter, so he does a lot of quick stabs and cuts less often. Red has two curved swords, so he tends more twards spinning moves and big swipes. That's changed a bit from what we originally intended. Originally, Red was supposed to be more like a broadsword fighter, but that didn't really feel natural with his design.

 

Not to derail this thread but ...

I was really enjoying the discussion between Dimos and Raf. Are you guys gonna continue the conversation elsewhere?

 

Yup. Now that I've got out from under all the stuff I was busy with, I'm starting a new thread in the OT section.

 

--Raf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We've been fooling around with other ways to use the Duel imagery, and Raf came up with this mock comics page. Repurposing is definitely my watchword these days.

 

We are down to the last handful of shots on Duel. Should be something substantial to show soon.

 

Steve

Anzovin Studio

post-8-1110492261.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that's a good idea as a teaser. It kind of sets the scene for the coming adventure.

If you're thinking of doing the whole story as a comic I would let the film have a good long run before you release the comic, but I'm sure you realise that anyway.

 

It's funny reading that first page. I expect to turn the page and find... COLIN! :D

Sorry, Raf, that was another thread. :)

 

Duel looks and sounds great!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I can't wait for this! 

 

Ditto. Do you guys have any estimates to when it'll be finished? Just curious.-

 

Robert

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Nicholas8681

Actually the style reminds me of Sleep Beauty more then anything. Great work guys.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Vey nice. I'm looking forward to this. I notice a small intersection of the guy in blacks leg with the statue arm. You probably fixed it but just in case....here's an image. Love the music too!

intersect.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Holy Charlie!! Awsome flick! But I noticed what Ken noticed(just to mention how people notice). I love it when topics like this gets short flick updates... :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Awesome stuff. I found the jittering of the trees in the second and third shots distracting but, all in all, loved it.

 

Edit: Just noticed you pointed the trees out in the OP.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, yeah, there are all kinds of pass throughs and wierd stuff in the movie at this point--we're just getting to the point where most of the animation is done and we can focus on the details. The vibrating trees, BTW, are caused by rendering a bone dynamics simulation through Netrender. We'll have to bake the tree animation first before we do final renders on those shots.

 

--Raf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...