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Hello,

 

My name is William and over the years I have been modeling and animating with AM. I recently 3D printed this guy out, (WIP). I also have been using hash to produce foam prototypes for the past year for local designers. Please let me know what you think.

 

warm regards,

 

William

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Those are quite impressive.

 

Perhaps as you do more projects in the future you could post some of your WIP so people might see your good work developing.

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Fantastic work, William!

 

If you get a chance, it would be great to get an overview of your process.

 

Very well done models...

 

Would you mind posting some rendered images of these characters? THey look very good!

*Fuchur*

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Thank you all for the compliments on my work. I will get some picts together showing my process and post them. In the short term, here is a pict of a rough build of the undead mech-soldier. I need to add lots of beveling still and the rib slots are quickly cut out. Also, lots of hoses to be added.

 

Warm regards,

 

William

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WOW! So different to the usual AM characters. I love it! How long are you using AM/doing 3D? Where have you been and why haven't you been posting!?! What do you use to make the foam characters? Is it an easy process?

 

PS You mis-spelled your forum name! :D

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WOWZEE!

 

It's hard to tell what scale those pix are, but they look GREAT! Is there a lot of prep-work and techniques in A:M (You keep mentioning the word 'bevel') Is there another 3D app involved? I'd like to see the machine that cuts the foam...is it laser?

 

SO many questions!!!

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Thanks everybody for the interest! Very inspiring! I am putting together some more photos of How I do this. But, in the mean time here is Brief description. Basically this is a time in has the more splines the better detail. I take a model and cut it up into segments and then align them in my 3D printer and then it cuts out the pieces out of foam. I then use epoxy to glue the pieces together and then fill seams with a joint compound or a putty. Sand a little and the put an clear coating over them. and then paint or make a mold. So lets say you have a transformer charter you have modeled in Hash and you would like a working model to sit on your desk or show to investors so that you can start creating your own toy line. A picture is worth a thousand words, but a model you can put in someones hands is worth a thousand pictures. You would mail me the model and I would cut it up and then start milling out the parts and assembling it. Mail it back to you. And yes you can have articulated joints to pose the model and transform it from a car to the butt kicking metal robot hero. Since I mill them in foam, I can make the model very affordable.

 

The designers I have worked with send these over seas to get the designs made in other materials, like metal or fiberglass. I have attached a few model models that are in the works(Sorry for the photo quality, quickly took photos). The screaming corpse head is popluar with a guy who makes custom lighting for motorcycles and cars.

 

Warm regards,

 

William

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Thanks everybody for the interest! Very inspiring! I am putting together some more photos of How I do this. But, in the mean time here is Brief description. Basically this is a time in has the more splines the better detail. I take a model and cut it up into segments and then align them in my 3D printer and then it cuts out the pieces out of foam. I then use epoxy to glue the pieces together and then fill seams with a joint compound or a putty. Sand a little and the put an clear coating over them. and then paint or make a mold. So lets say you have a transformer charter you have modeled in Hash and you would like a working model to sit on your desk or show to investors so that you can start creating your own toy line. A picture is worth a thousand words, but a model you can put in someones hands is worth a thousand pictures. You would mail me the model and I would cut it up and then start milling out the parts and assembling it. Mail it back to you. And yes you can have articulated joints to pose the model and transform it from a car to the butt kicking metal robot hero. Since I mill them in foam, I can make the model very affordable.

 

The designers I have worked with send these over seas to get the designs made in other materials, like metal or fiberglass. I have attached a few model models that are in the works(Sorry for the photo quality, quickly took photos). The screaming corpse head is popluar with a guy who makes custom lighting for motorcycles and cars.

 

Warm regards,

 

William

Ah, holy cow I totally butchered some of my spelling and sentence structure. Rule, do not try to type a message when trying to rush out of the studio. :-)

 

William

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This is fascinating William-

 

If I may ask--- the image in the center above (the skull)... the creases in the cheekbones...were they modeled in A:M with splines, or cut away from the foam with a dremel tool...?

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Does the process work with displacement maps?

 

Great question! If it creates geometry that is exported out to DXF, than yes. I will run a few tests. I can add in detail as well by hand as well if needed.

 

Warm Regards,

 

William

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Here are some more picts of my process. One shows the virtual view of the model and the other is a view of the wire frame once exported out as a DXF. I export all models at 16 polys per patch. I have included a snake head that I am making for a client as well. Also, I forgot to mention that I can scan in real world items as well and then save them out in to a DXF format for printing or model implentation.

 

Warm Regards,

 

William

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This is fascinating William-

 

If I may ask--- the image in the center above (the skull)... the creases in the cheekbones...were they modeled in A:M with splines, or cut away from the foam with a dremel tool...?

 

 

Thanks for the question. Some of the wrinkles are modeled in and others are add in with post print techniques that I have developed.

 

Warm Regards,

 

William

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hi alsome work What size of a cnc mill your using, what program are you using to convert the DXF file to g code and are you usng mach 3. You just gave me tones of Ideals and thank you for shairing your work totaly alsome.

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Here are some more picts of my process. One shows the virtual view of the model and the other is a view of the wire frame once exported out as a DXF. I export all models at 16 polys per patch. I have included a snake head that I am making for a client as well. Also, I forgot to mention that I can scan in real world items as well and then save them out in to a DXF format for printing or model implentation.

 

Warm Regards,

 

William

 

What technique are you using for scanning objects into the computer. Do you use a laser equipment?

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  • 4 weeks later...

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