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Most Watched TWO Scene


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As most of you know, "Tin Woodman of Oz" was a full-length 3D animated movie made by this forum using A:M (of course). Some of you participated in it. I'm very proud of it though it never received the acclaim it deserved, I follow the YouTube views of the various parts. In 10 years, the most viewed scene is Nancy Gormanzano's "Hippogyraf Song." (Nancy did several of the songs, she was awesome.) The question I've always had was why does this scene have 3x as many views as the next most popular, and 10x as many views as most of the movie? Perhaps you could comment...

 

 

p.s. I know it has hardly any views compared to most things. My goodness, I have a home video on one of my channels with over 100,000 views.

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I can't imagine those characters with any other voices. :)

 

I don't have any good guesses as to why Hippogyraph Song has more views.

Okay, perhaps one guess; the people involved with this sequence might have pointed people to it and the sequence has quite a few people involved.

For instance, I understand the voice of Hipposgyraf, Greg Schumsky has quite a following in the (way off broadway) theatrical world.

The modeler of Hippogyraf, Will Sutton is well respected as a modeler of splines and patches.

Riggers... can't quite recall who rigged Hippogyraf; Ken Heslip?

The supporting cast with Teresa (Woot), Robert (StrawBear)... drat, I knew I shouldn't start naming people because I'd forget someone.

 

And to add to the mystery, Hippogyraf is one of my favorite characters in TWO although I'm not exactly sure why.

I'd say it's a combination of things from design to voice to entertainment value.

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40,000 hits is too many to be a closed community response, and not enough to be viral. I've been assuming it's being linked somewhere because children like it but that's only a guess.

 

p.s. The home video I have with over 100,000 hits has gorillas in it.

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p.s. The home video I have with over 100,000 hits has gorillas in it.

 

 

That reminds of the stories about DC Comics noticing in the 50s or 60s that issues with gorillas on the cover sold better, which led to tons and tons of gorilla covers. :-)

 

40K is a large number, so I'd agree that at some point it must have gone "mini-viral."

 

I got excited about my view numbers last year (significantly less than 40K) until I noticed that a cat video that had only been up for an hour was in the 100Ks. It makes it frustrating when you realize that the effort-to-views ratio is greatly skewed against animation. But really, it's cool to know that you've made something that even a few people have enjoyed.

 

Now, if you'll excuse me, I'm going to start working on a project with a gorilla in it. :-)

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p.s. The home video I have with over 100,000 hits has gorillas in it.

 

 

That reminds of the stories about DC Comics noticing in the 50s or 60s that issues with gorillas on the cover sold better, which led to tons and tons of gorilla covers. :-)

 

40K is a large number, so I'd agree that at some point it must have gone "mini-viral."

 

I got excited about my view numbers last year (significantly less than 40K) until I noticed that a cat video that had only been up for an hour was in the 100Ks. It makes it frustrating when you realize that the effort-to-views ratio is greatly skewed against animation. But really, it's cool to know that you've made something that even a few people have enjoyed.

 

Now, if you'll excuse me, I'm going to start working on a project with a gorilla in it. :-)

 

 

Hey man at least you have more than I do, I have a whopping 56 views for my Christmas card I did (most of those being people that are related to me somehow).

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I recently passed 1,030 subscribers and my top video(Made with A:M) has over 120,000 views. Two of the others have 50,000 and 30,000 I think.

 

xhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1IWYZcI7egE

 

Youtube is not a "Post it and they will come" medium. It takes much work. The hardest part is getting your 1st 100 subs and your first 1,000 views. From

there things begin to get better. But for most of us it is a slow process.

 

Once there are a certain number of views, Youtube ascribes more attention to it and it shows up more in the "recommended" feeds

for more viewers to "Click."

This is why it takes so long to build an audience no matter how good or bad your content is. And for most people, it takes a lot of work to

get their content in front of a large viewing audience. Youtube is hard work in order to get seen. HOWEVER, there are some who get a quick

break here and there. We all hope for that magic bounce into getting the "Million" plus views on our hard work.

 

ALSO, a few years back, Youtube changed the algorithm to a "View-Time" dominated setup. This means that a "Cat" video shot on an iphone that is

3 minutes will make more money than an animation lasting 1minute. The cat video took only 3 minutes to make and a few additional minutes to post. Whereas

the animated short took 3 months or more to produce. This makes producing animation for the Youtube platform unprofitable in many cases. Especially when you

probably aren't going to get enough views to cover the time spent.

 

So if we want to make money on Youtube, we have a better chance with cat videos :)

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Hey Det & Rog, long time no see.

 

I was recently in Australia visiting Dylan Perry, longtime loyal A:M user, made his living off of A:M for a decade, now back with a new project (live action but uses A:M for graphics). Dylan has a video with near 2 million hits, and dozens of other videos with very high hit counts. His channel is SuperHappyDrift

 

This was difficult to make & long.

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Hello to you Martin!

 

Glad you are back. I've been here off and on, I was either really busy with work or had something else going on during the TWO days because I honestly had no clue that Robert was the voice of the Scarecrow until just the other day. But I've been working on my film off and on.

 

However as I've now reached "man of a certain age" status, I need to get more serious and actually finish this thing.

Hard to believe I am 42. I was even going to do a Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy themed b-day blowout with a few close friends, since I did nothing for the big 4-0 but did not get round to it due to other things coming up.

 

PM me if you're interested in hearing what is funding my film-making aspirations, and the adventures (or misadventures, more accurately) surrounding said source of funds.

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I recently passed 1,030 subscribers and my top video(Made with A:M) has over 120,000 views. Two of the others have 50,000 and 30,000 I think.

 

xhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1IWYZcI7egE

 

Youtube is not a "Post it and they will come" medium. It takes much work. The hardest part is getting your 1st 100 subs and your first 1,000 views. From

there things begin to get better. But for most of us it is a slow process.

 

Once there are a certain number of views, Youtube ascribes more attention to it and it shows up more in the "recommended" feeds

for more viewers to "Click."

This is why it takes so long to build an audience no matter how good or bad your content is. And for most people, it takes a lot of work to

get their content in front of a large viewing audience. Youtube is hard work in order to get seen. HOWEVER, there are some who get a quick

break here and there. We all hope for that magic bounce into getting the "Million" plus views on our hard work.

 

ALSO, a few years back, Youtube changed the algorithm to a "View-Time" dominated setup. This means that a "Cat" video shot on an iphone that is

3 minutes will make more money than an animation lasting 1minute. The cat video took only 3 minutes to make and a few additional minutes to post. Whereas

the animated short took 3 months or more to produce. This makes producing animation for the Youtube platform unprofitable in many cases. Especially when you

probably aren't going to get enough views to cover the time spent.

 

So if we want to make money on Youtube, we have a better chance with cat videos :)

 

Oh I realize I am unlikely to make money off YouTube with my videos, for just the reasons you listed. I'd probably have better luck if I had had a camera running the time my dog came running at the couch and tried to jump on it and bounced off the front.

I'm doing what I'm doing more for self-actualization at this point than any other reason.

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I'm thinking there might be an avenue with some of the smaller streaming services that are popping up. Back in 2012, I really thought that selling DVDs at conventions would be the way to go for me, but the convention culture has changed. They are more focused on celebrity guests and the "geek culture" has been offered up more as a fashion choice. The fact that the two biggest conventions I went to last year with the film festival had "Tattoo Alleys" speaks to the change. It's a boon for the convention owners because it's getting a lot more people in, but those people aren't really fans. I've talked with people wearing Star Trek cosplay who volunteer that they've never watched the show. They are there to enjoy all the attention their costumes bring, not to share in the fandom.

 

Vendor tables (even in Artist Alley) have become cost prohibitive, too.

 

The first Stalled Trek did well, but I'd overspent on producing it and didn't have the capital to set up at cons outside my local area. By the time I was out with The Wobbling Dead, I got lots of people looking at it, but nobody wanted to pay for the content and they didn't want a physical DVD they would have to carry around.

 

I gotta' say, doing the last Stalled Trek free and getting to be a guest at the conventions rather than having to manage a table and try to sell product all day, was much more fun. :-)

 

The real trick, of course, is just making more content. Doing one film every other year doesn't do much for developing an audience.

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