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strohbehn

*A:M User*
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Everything posted by strohbehn

  1. I've been playing with using lattices in distortion mode lately and found it an incredibly easy and fast way to morph one model into another. The really great thing about it is that all of my facial controls still work nearly perfectly on the new, morphed model. The guy on the left is my original head model. And the fellow on the right is his new African buddy. This took me all of about 45 minutes to do. Neat, huh? I love Animation Master!!!
  2. You're ear is coming along very nicely, Bill. Keep comparing your ear with photos as you model. Maybe even use photos for rotoscopes if you haven't already. Eventually, things seem to fall into place. It is a challenge, to be sure. Hey Will sutton, the skin shade on your model is amazing. Very nice form, too.
  3. Looks really nice. Dagooos' observations are accurate. I also notice that his knees unnaturally hyperextend at two points. One is just before the footfall out in front. And the other is when his entire weight is directly over the leg that's on the ground. If he were running, he'd be mostly on his toes... especially if he were running up hill. I'd keep this walk cycle as your "fast walk" or "determined walk" are rework a new action (based on this one) for your uphill walk.
  4. Hi John, The style of this animation is very appealing. Nice job! A couple of things caught my eye. 1. The introduction was overpowering and detracted from the main feature with the number of different colors used, speed of switching, and odd shapes. I think an understated, simple intro would work better... something that relates to the story. As a suggestion, you could fade in to your initial shot of the wall with the paintings on it and fade in your title and name on the open wall above the paintings. Then fade the title out and have your character enter to begin t
  5. In the sample project file that you posted, are the lower lip controls disabled or is there some constraint that I have to turn on that I've missed? It appears they are all on, but the nulls don't translate when the lower lip sliders are moved. Edited: After playing with this more... now the lower lip controls appear to work. I have no idea why they work now and didn't the last few times I've used this file. Also, the cheeks raise but won't do any I/O motion. And the nose will not raise. Any suggestions, David? (I'm using version 11.0h)
  6. Wow, you went way above and beyond the call of duty, David! Thanks so much for the detailed explanation of the CP weighting. Just one problem now, though... How am I supposed to get my work done today with a gem like this to study? I'll get back to you after I dig into this more tonight.
  7. Thanks for the reply, David, and for sharing your hard work. The way you've organized everything in the project file and web page makes it easier to understand this rig. I look forward to digging in deeper and figuring out exactly what you've done, when I get a bit more time. It's really an amazing rigging job. As for the forhead rig, you may be out of your mind but I'd still be interested in seeing what you did. Did you do it that way thinking you could achieve more realistic arcs of movement (as opposed to using muscle poses), or why? I'll have some questions for you in
  8. I'm really impressed with the rigging you did here. The additions you made are very useful and solve some of the problems that made me abandon this method in favor of muscle poses. Thanks for posting the rig and tutorial! That was a ton of work to do, I'm sure. Would you be willing to post a screen shot of the model in "bones mode" showing the CP weighting (the fancy-colored weight distribution shot)? Mark
  9. Hi John, I don't think I've ever replied to one of your posts yet, but every time I see one from you I smile and eagerly watch the movie to see what the latest innovation is. You've done some really interesting things, and I'm glad you're a regular on this forum. When I get the chance someday, I'm going to download all of your sample files (to make sure I have them on file) and have a great time learning the particulars of sprites, particles, decals, etc. It's gonna be great fun. Thanks for posting here, and keep up the good work! Mark
  10. Great crab, Ken! I've been thinkiing about the same thing for my lobster, but just didn't have time to look into a solution yet. I'll bet Paul's hair idea would do the trick nicely. There's one thing that bothers me with this model, though. His legs, body, eyes, and "forearms" are modeled beautifully... then the main pinchers are rounded on the inside. I'm not sure he could actually grab anything except at the very tips of the claws. What do you think? Also, I love the render on this one. Did you do that with a skylight rig, or what? I'm pretty lost when it comes to lig
  11. Here is a new version of the animation I did for the Anzovin Studios' "Setup Machine 2" contest in November. It's basically a commercial showcasing The Setup Machine's rigging capabilities. Toward the end I added a front flip (with a full tuck) for a little extra pizzaz. It goes by fast to stay in sync with the timing of the jumps, so you may need to step through frame-by-frame to appreciate it fully. Lo Res (Quicktime, Sorenson 3, 320x240, 1.1Mb) http://www.scc.net/~mbs/AnzovinContest2_LowRes.qt Enjoy!
  12. In a word... Outstanding! Great use of camera movement synchronized with the dramatic music. Nice job!
  13. Thanks for the encouragement and help, friends. I'm thinking now that the vocal track may be too exaggerated for this character. Unless I can put some of John Keates' suggestions to work to extend my pose limits, I may need to find a different track (or possibly tweak some of the poses). Justin, your "Animate a Face" tutorial was fantastic. I really enjoyed your presentation style, and the information was outstanding. It would have taken me months longer to learn the A:M interface (timeline, curves, etc.) and lipsync skills without "Animate a Face". Thanks for sharing your knowled
  14. Thanks for the great input, John. There's a lot there to work with. This part I'll have to look into: "setting the pre and post extrapolation of the channels in the poses". You are not referring to the percentage value of the poses' property (not sure I worded that correctly, and I'm not at my A:M computer to check it out) are you? As it is now, many of the poses are at their extremes and I haven't tried changing the percentage values to try to push them further. You're right about the eyelids, brows, neck and head movements needing more attention. I got a bit lost here witho
  15. I agree Rodney, it's fantastic. Let's give credit where it's due on this one. It's modeled after Jason Osipa's "Stop Staring" book, and uses the example of William Young's project file at this link: http://www.hash.com/forums/index.php?showt...&hl=osipa's I just implemented their great ideas.
  16. The "slider interface" works beautifully. It's very fast and intuitive because each slider can control up to three pose sliders. So instead of going back to the pose slider window for each little tweak (scrolling up and down the list of poses), the vast majority of the work is done from these few controls right next to the head. My favorite control is the "Lips" box. It controls: 1. Upper lip up 2. Upper lip down 3. Lower lip up 4. Lower lip down This control in addition to the "Sync" control (mouth narrow, wide, open, closed) lets you do nearly any symmetrical lip shape
  17. Thanks for the comments, guys. For reference purposes, the model is based on my face. You're right. As far as rendering goes, I just did a "render to file" with the action window active. I did it this way instead of in a choreography because I didn't want to mess with lighting, and it's very fast. It only takes about a minute to render, and being able to check the realtime result after making changes is really helpful. My computer can't quite play at realtime speed from the timeline.
  18. Hi gang, Here's a new lipsync I've been working on. This one has more extreme emotion to show what this setup is capable of. This clip is a render from the action window (Quicktime, Sorenson 3, 1.7MB) http://www.scc.net/~mbs/Yosemite27.mov This one is a wireframe that includes the onscreen interface I use for animating this critter. About 90% of the lipsync was done using the "slider interface" and the remaining 10% was tweeking the individual pose sliders. (DivX 5.1.1, 2.1MB) http://www.mstrohbehn.lunarpages.com/Videos/Yosemite26.avi Let me know what you all think.
  19. Nice job, Ken. The walk cycle comes off well with the secondary hand and head motions. I also like the solid feel of the footsteps and how they bend naturally throughout the cycle. I like the lighting, too. Something about the torso movement catches my eye. Does your troll's spine rotate around the vertical axis some? His chest and upper stomach could use some rotation with the shoulders. also, I keep wanting to see the hips rotate opposite of the shoulders. It's possible that you did this, but because of the massive upper body volume it's hidden a bit. Did
  20. Thank you all for your input (both here and on the "spline head" thread). I agree that the "V" and "F" forms need improvement on this one. As far as pushing the expressions more goes, you are all right there as well. I think what I'll do is start over with a much more dynamic soundtrack that has a broader range of emotions. Anthony Hopkins' deadpan expressions were what I had in mind with the slow eyeblinks. Unfortunately, deadpan doesn't work well outside of the intended context (especially in a 10 second clip with no body or background). I should have been more selective, b
  21. NOTE: I originally posted this on page 3 of the "My first spline head" thread, but now think that may doom it to obscurity .... so here it is by itself. Please take a look at this 10 second (2.6Mb - QT Sorenson 3) lipsync clip and fire away with suggestions. It's definitely time for some objective input! Lighting and textures were not my main focus here. I just wanted to try my hand at lipsync first, test my rig, and learn the interface. http://www.scc.net/~mbs/lipsynctest16.mov Also, I'd like to compress this further to get below the 1Mb file size limit so I can post
  22. Please take a look at this 10 second (2.6Mb - QT Sorenson 3) lipsync clip and fire away with suggestions. It's definitely time for some objective input! Lighting and textures were not my main focus here. I just wanted to try my hand at lipsync first, test my rig, and learn the interface. http://www.scc.net/~mbs/lipsynctest16.mov Also, I'd like to compress this further to get below the 1Mb file size limit so I can post it on this forum and not on a separate web page. What's the best format to use? Thanks!
  23. Here's the process, very quickly. Please get the project file from the link I mentioned in the first post and tear it apart. All of the elements are in that file. 1. In the modeling window, make the outlines for the interface and add type if you wish. 2. Add the nulls (modeling window), rename, resize, and position them in the proper places in the interface outlines. 3. Make a new On/Off pose and rename it Face Constraints. 4. In the relationship window (for the Face Constraint pose), click on a null and select New>constraint>translate limits. Set the "min"
  24. The squares are just visual guides that show the translation boundries of each null. Each null has a "transform (translate) relationship" set for its' X and Y value that is linked to pose slider positions.
  25. Here's a quick screenshot of the lipsync interface I just finished. It's modeled after Jason Osipa's "Stop Staring" book, and uses the example of William Young's project file at this link: http://www.hash.com/forums/index.php?showt...&hl=osipa's Each null visible on the right controls anywhere from 2-4 pose sliders. The individual right and left poses are still controlled via the pose slider window. After some texturing and lighting adjustments I'll be starting the lipsync project. Comments and suggestions welcome.
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